New Record for Enrollment in e-Learning Course on the Global Commons

26 April 2012, Geneva, Switzerland – Registration for the first Introductory e-Learning Course to the Global Commons, with more than 370 participants from all over the world enrolled, is terminated. The course is free of charge for participants and has been developed by the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) and the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business.

pianeta ecologicoThe term “global commons” refers to resources that are shared by all of humanity such as the sky, the oceans or even the planet itself, and to the sum of various local and regional commons across the world. The term also reflects a philosophical approach directly related to issues of environmental sustainability and human development aimed toward a wise use of the earth for all living species, as well as for future generations.

This increasingly relevant topic has raised the interest of 377 individuals coming from 73 different countries. The Academic sector is particularly well represented; in fact 42% of the participants are university students, researchers and professors. The fact of training people who teach is useful to create a multiplier effect for spreading knowledge on Global Commons issues.

A balanced gender distribution (154 females and 223 males) and a substantial presence of participants from least developed countries and developing countries (31% of participants) are concrete evidence of a global interest in discovering this fascinating subject that, although new, is already playing a key role in the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals.

The first Introductory e-Learning Course to the Global Commons is being delivered through UNITAR’s Virtual Learning Environment and finishes on 14 May 2012. Due to this high demand of training on this topic, UNITAR and the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business are considering the implementation of an additional session of the course which would take place during the second semester of 2012.

 (Image © Luigi Giordano - Fotolia)