Product ID: 1274 - English
Published: 10 Oct, 2008
GLIDE: CE-2008-000001-GEO
FootPrint (Lat x Long, WSG84 Geographic, decimal degrees)
TopLeft: 42.167 x 44.061
BottomRight: 42.148 x 44.076

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This map presents a satellite-based damage assessment for the affected village of Tkviavi, Gori District, Georgia following the armed conflict between Georgian and Russian military forces, August 2008. Damaged buildings have been identified with WorldView-1 & Formosat-2 satellite imagery acquired on 19 August 2008. Pre-conflict QuickBird imagery in Google Earth was also used. Affected buildings were classified either as destroyed or severely damaged by standard satellite image interpretation methods. Destroyed buildings have been defined either by the total collapse of the structure or when it was standing but with less than 50% of the roof still intact. Severely damaged buildings were defined as having visible structural damage to a portion of one wall, or where a section of the roof was damaged but with over 50% of the roof still intact. The estimated total number of affected buildings for the selected village is approximately 25. Of this total 19 buildings have likely been destroyed and 6 buildings have likely been severely damaged. An important preliminary finding of this satellite damage analysis is the observed heavy concentration of damages within clearly defined residential areas. Please note, this is an initial damage assessment and has not yet been independently validated on the ground. Map scale for A3: 1:5,800; Projection : Pulkovo 1995 GK Zone 8N; Datum : Pulkovo 1995.
Satellite Data : WorldView-1
Resolution : 50 cm
Imagery Date : 19 August 2008
Copyright : Digital Globe (2008)
Source: U.S. Department of State - HIU
Access Rules : NextView "EULA" - 2008
Additional Imagery : Formosat-2 (2m pansharpened)
Imagery Copyright : NSPO 2008
Imagery Date : 19 August 2008
GIS Data : USGS, UNEP, UNOSAT
Damage Analysis : UNOSAT